necropticon:

here’s an idea: people shouldn’t actually have to have a job to be allowed to remain alive

(Source: gutcolour, via freshmouthgoddess)

— 2 days ago with 26943 notes
"Be passionate about what you write, believe in your ability to convey timeless ideas, and let no one tell you what what you’re capable of."
Christina Westover (via writersrelief)

(via calligraphypen)

— 2 days ago with 1990 notes
BREAKING: Protesters Shut Down D.C. Streets for Mike Brown →

thepoliticalfreakshow:

A large crowd of protesters has descended upon a northeast neighborhood in Washington, D.C., taking over the streets, on Saturday night in a symbol of solidarity with their counterparts in Ferguson, Missouri, who called for justice for Mike Brown earlier during the day.

The Washington protesters chanted: “Whose streets? Mike’s Streets” and “We’re young, we’re strong, we’re marching all night long” as they walked down H Street northeast, at one point hitting the Bladensburg Road intersection, with police not far away.

"H Street shut it down, racist cops, shut it down," they sang while shaking tambourines, clapping and drumming.

The protest was being live-streamed on UStream.

Protesters also took to Twitter with the hashtag #DCFerguson.

The crowd, carrying signs that say “Am I Next?” and “Justice for Mike Brown,” has stopped traffic and some drivers are honking at the protesters. A man on the live-stream video said the march has halted two Greyhound buses from driving. The rally is a grassroots effort, said a man on a bullhorn who seemed to be leading the protest.

Brown, an unarmed teenager, was shot and killed by a police offer on August 9. His death sparked multiple protests in the St. Louis suburb of Missouri, some of which were met with tear gas and tanks. People in other U.S. cities have also marched in response, calling for justice for Brown as well as an end to racial inequality.

On Saturday morning, hundreds of protesters in Ferguson, led by Brown’s parents and family members, began their peaceful march on West Florissant Avenue, which has become the center of several demonstrations since Brown’s death.

(via saltysojourn)

— 2 days ago with 1437 notes
oh I want some paranormal romance too... because →

deedeecontroversy:

blackfangirlsunite:

freshmouthgoddess:

blackfangirlsunite:

freshmouthgoddess:

I need books about black girls being loved fiercely , being promised eternal love and being protected with ferocity. .. because lol

I feel ya. I want a black girl to get…

— 2 days ago with 249 notes
south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:
Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

(via freshmouthgoddess)

— 2 days ago with 10547 notes

gradientlair:

Charlene Carruthers (@CharleneCac) appeared on The Melissa Harris-Perry Show to discuss youth and activism (cause yeah, some millennials are Black). She’s the National Coordinator for Black Youth Project (@BYP_100). Love that she discussed as a queer Black woman, her work includes Black girls/Black women (as when violence is discussed, our experiences continue to be erased) and Black LGBTQ people, in general. Good chat.

(Source: www,gradientlair.com)

— 2 days ago with 35 notes
Letter to a prospective suitor: a lesson on white male prvilege

When you contacted me earlier this summer I rejected your invitation, but you’ve persisted in this pursuit. 

Perhaps you need clarification.

Did you read the entirety of my response, or just the part that turned you on? I am not a domme, and I don’t want to play pretend domme.  What part of “deal with your own privilege issues” did you not get?  Your performance of privilege as a White man gets in the way of finding a Black woman in the BDSM scene, but you clearly do not care about resolving that issue because you do not empathize with anyone who does not share your status or privilege with regard to race, class, and gender.  You don’t seem to interested in engaging in kink with a Black woman in a way that shows and encourages mutual respect and dignity between consenting adults.  Rather, you have constructed a virtual landscape that reveals your contempt and anger towards Black women because of your inability to surpass your limits as a person with privileged status—yes, your performance of privileged status limits your ability to transform your life and build loving, lasting relationships with your woman of preference.

Your profile picture featuring a Black woman’s pair of feet being used to cover your face sends a clear message to me that you view Black women as sexual accessories for your entertainment.  Her face does not exist—just her feet.  You, on the other hand, need not show your face in that image because your skin color does not invoke accessory status—it invokes dominance and supremacy.  White male privilege as an ideology encourages such fetishization of women of color as playthings.  Your invitations further indicate your inability to view and treat Black women with respect and dignity as full human beings who are equal to you.  You would rather put Black women into mythological constructs for your own entertainment.  As such, you don’t seem to be interested in matters of the heart in a manner that would help or heal. 

Further, based on your proposed scenarios, you seem to be interested in invoking much more destructive emotions like rage and bitterness.  Why would you expect me to pretend to be a hateful, greedy, vengeful person, or worse, pretend to be self-centered and oblivious to others who are different from me?  You seem to think that the only way for you to dismantle your privilege is to pretend being oppressed opposite me pretending to be privileged.  Why not work on dismantling your gender and race privilege from within so that you can participate in a much more transformative and progressive process of social justice as a part of a much larger collective? 

Or is that an impossible course of action because of your socioeconomic status and your narcissism? 

You clearly don’t like being told no.  In fact, you clearly refuse to accept it.  As a person with gold status you don’t accept rejection because you believe yourself and people who share your status to be the only people that matter.   Your politics as a progressive do not give you a free pass on your privilege issues.  Claiming to be a progressive while treating me and other women of color as commodities with no right to give or not give consent just makes you a much more stealth predator.  In such a world-view like that, people like me are tools and toys to use and discard.  I suspect that your everyday dealings with us are less than honorable or respectful. 

You are attempting to impose your presence in my life by topping from the bottom, but you.  I don’t need that headache in my life.  I’m not your personal guru for your spiritual path.   I’m not your magical Negro or mammy. 

The answer is yet again no.

— 5 days ago
Daywalker. (at University of the District of Columbia)

Daywalker. (at University of the District of Columbia)

— 6 days ago
"But suppose God is black? What if we go to Heaven and we, all our lives, have treated the Negro as an inferior, and God is there, and we look up and He is not white? What then is our response?"
Robert Kennedy (via revenge-of-socrates)

(via blackandwoman)

— 1 week ago with 184 notes